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Full text of "Neighborhood analysis, Williamston, North Carolina"



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NEIGH 




ANALYSli 













WILLIAMSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



ABSTRACT 



TITLE : 
AUTHOR : 

SUBJECT: 
DATE: 



Neighborhood Analysis, Williams ton, N. C. 

iamston Planning Board with assistance from the Division of 
Community Services, Department of Natural and Economic Resources 

An analysis of living and environmental conditions of the 
inspection areas within the planning area of the Town of 
Wi 1 1 iams ton , N . C . 

December 1972 



LOCAL 
PLANNING 
AGENCY : 

SOURCE OF 
COPIES : 



Will iams ton Planning Board 



Town Hall 

Williamston, No C. 27892 

N„ C. Department of Natural and Economic Resources 

Division of Community Services 

P. 0. Box 27687 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27611 



HUD 

PROJECT 
NUMBER : 

SERIES 

NUMBER : 

NUMBER OF 
PAGES : 



4867 



One of Three 



95 



ABSTRACT: This report is a breakdown of the eight inspection areas of the 
Town of Williams ton's planning area. It is an analysis of the 
housing conditions, recreation available, areas of crime, disease 
and general living conditions of the citizens. 




/A 

\ 



"%,./ 






■ 























NORTH CAROLINA 



_(_ 



The preparation of this report was financed in part through an 
urban planning grant from the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, under the provision of Section 701 of the Housing 
Act of 1954, as amended. 



PREPARED FOR THE 
TOWN OF WILLIAMSTON, NORTH CAROLINA 
N. C. Green, Mayor 



Town Board of Commissioners 

Go W. Corey 
Wilber Edwards 
G. C. Griffin, Jr. 
R. B. Goddard 
T. C. Perry 



Planning Board 

J. E. Griffin, Chairman 

J. H. Gurganus 

James E. Leathers, Jr, 

J. 0. Perry, Jr. 

W. E. Ritter 



J. B. Godwin, Town Administrator 

John T. Boykin, Jr., Administrative Assistant to the 
Town Commissioners for Planning and Development 



N. C. DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL & ECONOMIC RESOURCES 
James E, Harrington, Secretary 



COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 

Harold E. Strong, Administrator 

Mark B. Sullivan, Assistant Administrator 



NORTHEASTERN FIELD OFFICE 
Thomas B. Richter, Field Office Chief 



PROJECT STAFF 

Patrick J. Dayson, Project Planner 
Marian J. Alligood, Secretary 



September 1972 
Published April 1973 



Price $2.00 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The assistance of two summer interns, students of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, accomplished the door to door survey and 
gathered the basic data for this report. Without their assistance in the 
first draft of the report and assistance furnished to Pitt Technical In- 
stitute, Greenville, North Carolina, in placing this information on data 
processing, this report could not have been completed in as detailed a form 
within the allocated time. The two gentlemen are: 

Mr. James W. Cope land Mr. Thomas H. Shepard 

407 East High Street 98 Pembroke Circle 

Murfreesboro, North Carolina Eden ton, North Carolina 

All of the gathered data, over 200,000 items of information, was placed 
on data processing by Mrs. Mildred T« McGrath, CDP, her staff and students 
at Pitt Technical Institute, Greenville, North Carolina. 

All the information for this Neighborhood Analysis has been retained 
in the data processing memory bank by Pitt Technical Institute and kept up 
to date by making changes to the master copy by checking the records of the 
Building Inspector and Housing Authority of Williamston, North Carolina. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

INTRODUCTION 5 

PLANNING AREA ANALYSIS 9 

GENERAL ANALYSIS OF WILLIAMSTON , N. C. 13 

CRIME AND CRIME PREVENTION 19 

FIRE PROTECTION 23 

EDUCATION 29 

PUBLIC WELFARE AND HEALTH 31 

THE SURVEY 39 

SURVEY FORM 43 

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 87 

RECOMMENDED AREA TREATMENT BY AREA 93 



MAPS 

MAP 1 RESISTANCE TO SURVEY- LOW EDUCATION 17 

MAP 2 DELINQUENCY AND DISEASE 21 

MAP 3 INDUSTRIAL SITES AND FIRE HYDRANTS 25 

MAP A TOWN INSPECTION AREAS 41 



Tables page 4 



TABLES 



TABLE 1 FIRE HYDRANTS 

TABLE 2 CLASSIFICATION OF FIRES 

TABLE 3 FIRE CALLS 

TABLE 4 HEALTH INFORMATION 

TABLE 5 OCCUPATIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT 

SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE TOTAL AREAS 

Area 1 

Area 2 

Area 3 

Area 4 

Area 5 

Area 6 

Area 7 

Area 8 



Pag 


e 


23 




27 




27 




32 




34- 


35 


45- 


46 


50- 


51 


55- 


56 


59- 


60 


64- 


65 


69- 


70 


74- 


75 


78- 


79 


82- 


83 



INTRODUCTION 

Perhaps it is proper for one to ask the question which has not been 
properly answered in the past - Why have we allowed the decay of the beloved 
city of Williamston? The answer to the question can be only made by the 
citizens of Williamston. What can be done to stop and to reverse this grow- 
ing decay is also left up to the populace of Williamston. 

The Neighborhood Analysis is a study of Williamston and its exterri- 
torial jurisdictional area, the territory that extends approximately one mile 
from the city limits. It is done on an area-by-area basis to determine the 
nature, extent and causes of substandard living conditions in Williamston. 
It involves the cooperation of various city and county agencies in the 
accumulation of data, plus a thorough survey based on the interviews of the 
residents of Williamston* 

The survey, which is the main body of the Neighborhood Analysis , 
asked questions concerning housing conditions, economic conditions, displace- 
ment, and military service. The questions were answered on a voluntary 
basis. The questions asked were only seldomly not answered. Few problems 
arose from this method of a thorough survey rather than the usual sample 
survey . 

The Neighborhood Analysis is, in summary, a comprehensive study based 
on documented data. It is intended that this study will shed light on the 
width and depth of deterioration of Williamston and will make realistic 
suggestions for corrective measures. 



June 5, 1972 
TO THE CITIZENS OF WILLIAMSTON , NORTH CAROLINA 

As you know, the Williamston Planning Board and other organizations 
have been very active over the past several years in making plans for 
improvement of your Town. 

A few of the projects that have been accomplished and planned for 
the future are : 

1. The 100 units of P u blic Housing located on East Main Street and 
Warren Street, 

2. Neighborhood Development Program now beginning on Washington Street, 

3. The establishment of the "Williamston Junior Police Club" on the 
Jamesville Road, 

4. Additions to the town water and sewerage facilities, 

5. Beautif ication of the business district for better shopping for the 
citizens, 

6. A proposed shopping center, 

7. Community Centers and home for aged, 

8. Better recreation, 

In order to continue to receive financial assistance for some programs, 
it is necessary to continually up-date information on our Town and the citizens 

This is to introduce 

Mr. Thomas H. Shepard, Jr. and 
Mr. James W. Cope land, Jr. 

These two gentlemen are assisting to up-date required information for 
Williamston. Please give your time and cooperation. 

J. E. Griffin 

The Williamston Town Government has responded to the challenge of our 
day by mounting ambitious programs to improve the social, economical, and 
physical condition for all citizens. Commissioners; your assistance is 
appreciated. 

N. C. Green 
Mayor 



HOUSING STRUCTURAL CONDITION 

This structural survey is to determine where physical deterioration is 
taking place and how it is manifested in the form of tangible deficiencies. 
The following will be used for the rating of the structures : 



Rating 

Good Condition 

Fair Condition 

Poor Condition 



Dilapidated Condition 



Description 

A sound structure from all appearances. Any 
maintenance needed is of a minor nature, such 
as those items that need to be done annually. 

A sound structure, as above, but minor main- 
tenance items have been allowed to build up 
for a number of years. 

Still a sound structure from outward appearance 
but major repairs are indicated, such as porch 
rebuilding, new siding, or other repairs that 
will involve an expenditure exceeding $500. 

Some evidence such as a crumbling foundation, 
sagging roof, or building walls - that make 
the structure unsound, or in need of major 
repairs that would involve an expenditure of 
dollars beyond the value of the structure- 
(This condition implies that the structure 
is virtually unfit for occupancy, or unsound, 
or is a major blighting influence on 
surrounding structures and property.) 

ENVIRONMENTAL 

The following environmental deficiencies are often the catalyst that 

often start or accelerate deterioration as an external force in the 

neighborhood. 

Rating Description 

1 Overcrowding a structure, thus cutting off 

light and air . 

2 Poor layout of structure, which tends to 

cause confusing, inefficiency, and reduction 
in value. 



Rating Description 

3 Mixed land use of conflicting nature, such 

as residential uses, in close proximity to 
the noisy and dirty industrial uses. 

4 Residential or light commercial uses front- 
ing on or in close proximity to heavily 
traveled roads, thus causing susceptibility 
to vehicular noise, exhaust fumes, and head- 
light glare. 

5 Lack of off-street parking in areas of narrow 

streets and high density of use. 

6 Sameness of environment, large areas of 

identical structures having no real character 
or spirit of individualism, (Example: 
Identical tenant house, row houses.) 

NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES 

This is to determine the degree to which the neighborhood is receiving 
services or facilities both public and semi-public; included are sanitary 
sewer, water facilities, parks, educational facilities, fire and police 
protection, religious institutions, recreation facilities, etc. These items 
will be indicated on the survey form as to grading. 

STRUCTURE OCCUPANTS 

The form provided will be used for the answer to the questions desired 
for the write-up of the citizens living within the Town of Williamston. 

SOCIAL 

Generally social conditions will pinpoint areas of future physical 
deterioration. In addition to fulfilling the need for delineating social problem 
areas, the information will be used in the "recommended treatment" of problem 
areas . 



The following information will be obtained from persons knowledgeable on 
social topics, such as local health officer, Chief of Police, Fire Chief, etc. 

1. Fires 

2 . Crimes 

3. Juvenile Delinquency 

4. Infectious Disease 

5. Welfare Recipients 

6. Illegimate Births 



PLANNING AREA ANALYSES 
Questions To Be Answered- - 

1. Housing conditions, included the location and extent of blight or 
potential blight. 

2. Characteristics of families affected by poor housing. 

3. Conditions in nonresidential areas, including location and extent of blight 
and potential blight. 

4. Adequacy of community facilities and services, both public and private. 

5. Causes of blight. 

6. Steps needed to eliminate present blight and prevent future blight. 

7. Priority schedule of steps needed to eliminate blight by specific area. 

8. Plan of action, neighborhood by neighborhood, designed to make each area 
a continuing asset to the town. 






£N 









1AL ANALYS& 



\ 



GENERAL ANALYSIS OF WILLIAMSTON, N. C. 

The atmosphere one feels from the people and particularly the leaders 
of Williams ton is cautious progress. The people are forward looking in 
respect to education, crime and fire prevention, and sewer and water 
facilities; but these same people feel that housing and economic conditions 
are adequate. The Caucasian people of Williams ton feel that whatever type 
of governmental program will be in effect is geared to the Negroes. The 
Negroes do not feel that enough housing projects are available to them. 

The housing and economic situation in Williamston is very bad in about 
one half of the town. The Negroes seem to be benefitting the most from 
housing projects because they realize the conditions they live in are sub- 
standard and want to improve them. In low income Caucasian areas where the 
people could benefit greatly from housing and economic programs established 
by the government, the people are opposed to any program because they do not 
want to be classed with Negroes and, therefore, refuse to apply for help from 
the government. The Caucasians are at or just above poverty level. 

The government has neglected to educate the people of Williamston about 
programs that could help them. The people are extremely confused about hous- 
ing and economic programs, and this confusion leads to open hostility towards 
the government and members of minority races People do not know who to 
approach about questions they have, The local media should be used to 
inform the public about what is being done, how the people might help, who 
is doing what, who is eligible for help under the program, and how one might 
apply for assistance for each program. 



13 



The professional employees of the town are very capable. Chief of 
Police, John Swain, is very forward looking. His leadership In establishing 
the "Williamston Junior Police Club" has given the young people a place to go 
that they enjoy and at the same time keep these young people out. of trouble. 
There are four firemen employed full-time by the City of Williamston. The 
men know their job well and can point out the drawbacks the department has 
readily. A full- time fire chief is necessary for the department to run more 
smoothly and efficiently. (A Fire Chief was hired in September.) The 
water system of the town desperately needs modernizing. 

The sanitation department is doing a very commendable job. Trash is 
deposited in a sanitary land-fill. Backyard garbage pick-up makes Williamston 
a more beautiful city by not having garbage cans lining the streets every day. 

Other than necessary services such as fire, police, and sanitation, the 
city leaders seem to be satisfied with the status quo . In house to house 
observation, it seems the cause of this may be the lack of college educated 
young people returning to Williamston to live. Lower educated people have 
every opportunity to step forward and push for a better town but they do not, 
therefore, progress is slow. All programs that the city adopts seem to be 
pushed upon them by the federal and state governments. When one is forced to 
do something, it is not nearly as desirable as when one conceives the idea 
himself , 

The people of the city seem to be changing, however. Recently a school 
bond issue was passed overwhelmingly in Martin County. The vote for the bond 
in Williamston outnumbered the vote against the bond in the entire county. 
The people are also noticing the better housing low income people are getting 



14 






in the housing projects and can now appreciate these projects. This is not to 
say the people have completely changed. They are still prejudiced, but they 
are also accepting forced change. 

The largest source of untapped community leadership is in the middle 
class Negro population. These people have many innovative ideas and have a 
better view of needs, because they grew up in poverty areas and in many cases 
forced to continue living in poverty areas. The Caucasian leaders are not 
allowing Negro participation other than on a token basis in city government. 
Negro participation in city government would not only bring new life to the 
city, but would also ease some of the racial tension in Williamston. 

There has not been any racial uprising in Williamston, but one can sense 
friction in nearly all houses. Caucasians are tired of "those niggers" getting 
everything free. Negroes have a great distrust for the Caucasians, The average 
Negro man wants nothing to do with the Caucasian man because he feels he will 
be mistreated mentally, physically, and monetarily. These citizens of 
Williamston are not able to conceal their prejudices. Negroes and Caucasians 
live in segregated neighborhoods that are clearly separated. La.rge open areas 
or commercial areas or streets or railroad tracts separate races. In 
isolated areas Caucasians may live in a Negro neighborhood. When this occurs, 
the Caucasians may know the nearest Caucasian person but do not know their 
closer Negro neighbors. These Negro neighbors do not know the Caucasian 
either. Until the average Negro and Caucasian citizens are able to discuss 
problems facing the city, racial tension will remain. The city leaders are 
to be commended for the effort in putting Negroes on all appointed boards of 
the city. This is a start, but the trend must continue to all in every situation 



15 



Map 1 points out areas where this survey team had trouble. This is not 
to say all people located in the shaded areas were against the survey, but 
the great majority were. In the same respect, there were people in the 
unshaded area who were opposed to the survey but these people did not surmount 
a total worth condemming the entire neighborhood. All of the shaded areas are 
Caucasian areas where complete surveys were done. All Negro neighborhoods 
responded very willingly to the survey. The Caucasian neighborhoods that are 
unshaded were higher income neighborhoods where the complete survey was not 
asked. 

The City of Williamston needs improvement in the many areas discussed 
above. This study presents plans for improvement and assigns priorities to 
meet the needs best for the city in this neighborhood analysis. These sugges- 
tions may not be the only answers but the purpose of the report is to point out 
the problems and to show exactly where they are. 



16 



Map 1 points out areas where this survey team had trouble. This is not 
to say all people located in the shaded areas were against the survey, but 
the great majority were. In the same respect, there were people in the 
unshaded area who were opposed to the survey but these people did not surmount 
a total worth condemming the entire neighborhood. All of the shaded areas are 
Caucasian areas where complete surveys were done. All Negro neighborhoods 
responded very willingly to the survey. The Caucasian neighborhoods that are 
unshaded were higher income neighborhoods where the complete survey was not 
asked. 

The City of Williamston needs improvement in the many areas discussed 
above. This study presents plans for improvement and assigns priorities to 
meet the needs best for the city in this neighborhood analysis. These sugges- 
tions may not be the only answers but the purpose of the report is to point out 
the problems and to show exactly where they are. 



16 



TOWN OF WILLIAMSTON 



I HIGH RESISTANCE 
TO SURVEY 

LOW EDUCATION 

HIGH RESISTANCE 
^^™ TO SURVEY AND 
LOW EDUCATION 




CRIME AND CRIME PREVENTION 

Police action in Williams ton in recent years has been directed toward 
crime prevention rather than crime detention. This approach accents the 
progressive nature of Williamston' s Police Department. This crime prevention 
is largely centered around the "Williamston Junior Police Club" on Jamesville 
Road. It is mainly responsible for the dramatic drop in juvenile deliquency. 
Only ten juvenile complaints were taken to court in 1971. This was out of a 
total of only twenty-one juvenile complaints that were handled by the police 
during the whole year. These complaints involved such things as larceny, 
skipping school, and vandalism. As another note of the effectiveness of 
crime prevention in Williamston, there were no armed robberies in 1971. 

Juvenile complaints have been coming from predominantly Negro neighbor- 
hoods as well as the low- to lower middle Caucasian neighborhoods. Breaking 
and entering is found primarily in the Negro neighborhoods along Washington 
Street. The specific areas of the juvenile complaints as well as those of 
the breaking and entering can be found on Map 2. 

Continued public support and public participation will greatly enhance 
the "Williamston Junior Police Club" in its mission of crime prevention. 
This support must include financial backing in order to have the program in 
the future. This program must be allowed to grow in order to prevent future 
juvenile deliquency. All juveniles must be able to participate in these 
police-supervised activities. 



19 







^ 



FIRE PROTECTION 

Fire portection in Williamston is in great need of improvement if one 
does not want a potential holocaust in the not so distant future. The 
professional firemen are very well- trained . The two major inadequacies of 
the Williamston Fire Department appear to be under-sized water lines, and 
location of the lines. 

On Map 3, one can see the location of the hydrants that draw from 4", 
6", 8", and 10" water lines. All the 10" water lines should be replaced 
with 16" lines. In fact, all lines should be replaced with larger lines. The 
most urgent need is the replacal of all the 4" lines. These hydrants are 
one- thousand feet apart at the most. The following table shows the percentage 
of hydrants from each size line. 

TABLE 1 
Hydrants (Number) Percentage 



4" 


24 


12% 


6" 


150 


76% 


8" 


21 


10% 


10" 


4 


2% 



199 100% 

The fire department has the equipment to pump 3,000 gallons of water per 
minute but there is no hydrant that is connected to a water line that could 
draw that amount of water at that rate. Needless to say, a general increase 
in the size of the water lines in Williamston is needed. 



23 



TOWN OF WILLIAMSTON 



INDUSTRIAL, LIGHT 
INDUSTRIAL, HEAVY 
10" FIRE HYDRANT 

8" FIRE HYDRANT 
FIRE HYDRANT 

4" FIRE HYDRANT 




There are three major classifications of the type of fires. Class A 
concerns wood, paper, or rubbish. Class B is started by flammable liquids. 
Class C fires are electrical fires. The following table shows an 
estimation of the percentage of types of fires in Williamston. 

TABLE 2 
Types Percentage 

Class A 60% 

Class B 30% 

Class C 10% 

The number of calls to the fire department has been reduced dramatically 
in recent years. The reason for this drop is the conversion of many houses 
that were heated by wood to gas and oil heat. Saw mills which were a source 
of wood in years past have gone out of business. Because of this action, 
the conversion was necessary. The reason for the relatively low number of 
false calls is that Williamston handles all of its fire calls by telephone; 
thus, preventing many false alarms that occur in places where only pulling 
a switch places an alarm to the fire department. 

TABLE 3 
Year Fire Calls False Calls 



1969 


162 





1970 


172 


4 


1971 


127 


3 


thru July 


62 


1 


13, 1972 







27 



There are two water tanks owned by the town on the corner of Sycamore 
and Tank Streets. There is a private tank on the Roanoke River at the 
fertilizer plant. Wells for the town are located on Church Street, at the 
High School football field, and two at the tanks on Sycamore Street, 



28 



EDUCATION 

The Williamston Planning Area has three schools in its boundaries. One 
is located on Smithwick Street. This is the high school. The junior high 
school is located on Washington Street. The elementary school is located 
on School Drive and Church Street. 

Williamston' s educational situation is on the depressing side. The 
drop-out rate in Martin County runs between forty-five and fifty- five per 
cent. In the town, the lower income Caucasian areas and predominatedly 
Negro areas have high rates of low education. Map 1 shows areas where at 
least thirty- five per cent of the area marked has people who did not graduate 
from high school. This area is too great for the citizens of Williamston. 

On the bright side, Martin County voters passed a school bond issue on 
July 11th by an overwhelming majority. The Williamston precincts showed an 
even larger margin of approval. Regardless of arguments that the bond issue 
was not needed, one must see the vote as an acceptance by the people of the 
responsibility of having good public schools. This is indeed a switch in public 
attitude in recent years. The last three school bond issues had been defeated 
decisively . 

Another bright spot in the Williamston area and Martin County is 
Martin Technical Institute. It is located out on U. S. 64 outside of the 
planning area. Its courses include those one would think of finding in a 
community college rather than a technical institute. 



29 



Obviously, the educational standards of Williamston need to be raised. 
The education of the Negroes is unusually low when compared to the education 
of the Caucasians. Well over eighty per cent of the Negroes live in areas 
designated on the map as areas where at least thirty- five per cent of the 
people do not have a high school education. Much work is needed to further 
educate both poor Caucasians and Negroes. 



30 



PUBLIC WELFARE AND HEALTH 

Social Services 

The information that was provided by the Martin County Department of 
Social Services is based on the entire county and not: just Williamston. There 
is no data compiled giving the number of Old Age Survivors Income (OASI) 
who also receive Public Assistance and Medicaid. It is established that 
approximately 450 of the 768 recipients in all categories receive OASI, One 
hundred and seventy-one receive Aid to the Disabled, permanently and totally 
disabled mentally or physically, with 105 receiving a money payment and 66 
receiving medical services only. There are 28 recipients of Aid to the Blind, 
One hundred and seventy- eight people are receiving financial assistance in 
the Aged category, and 235 aged people are receiving medicaid. 

The information on food stamps is also based on the entire Martin 
County area. The average number of families receiving food stamps in the 
county during the period from July, 1971, through June, 1972, a month is 796. 
The average number of people receiving food stamps a month is 3,103. Per 
month, the number of families receiving food stamps ranged from 651 in August, 
1971, to 875 in April, 1972. Per month, the number of people receiving food 
stamps ranged from 2,372 in August, 197.1, to 3,468 in April, 1972. 
Health 

The Martin County Health Department gave the information concerning 
hepatitus, tuberculosis, venereal disease, and illegitimate births. Table 4 
shows the number of each during the last three twelve-month periods, This 
information is for Williamston only. 



31 



TABLE 4 
HEALTH INFORMATION 

69-70 70-71 
Tuberculosis 
Hepatitis 
Venereal Disease 
Illegitimate Births 



71-72 



5 


4 


3 











6 


8 


10 


33 


18 


28 



The reason hepatitus was included is because there were several cases 
reported in the County. One must notice that there are no cases in Williamston 
Reported cases of tuberculosis and illegitimate births appear to have no 
definite trends up or down but the number of venereal diseases appears to 
be steadily increasing. 



32 



MAJOR INDUSTRY AND INDUSTRIAL SITES 

The industry picture within Williamston is somewhat bleak, however, 
this is not true for the county. The major industries of Williamston are 
Jefferson Mills, which produces textiles; Kerr McGee, which produces 
agricultural chemicals; June Day, which produces garments; Williamston Plywood 
Company; Williamston Meat Packing Company, and the W. I. Skinner Company, which 
processes tobacco. The last company does not operate at full capacity the year- 
round. It employs approximately two-hundred and fifty on just a seasonal 
basis. Others are employed permanently there. 

The prospective industrial sites are, for the most part, located outside 
of the city limits. This is so because industries do not want double taxation 
that would result if they were to locate in town. If they were, they would 
pay both city and county taxes. Eight hundred acres of land, however, is 
zoned as a future industrial site within the city limits. It is located near 
the Roanoke River and south of the by-pass. One hundred sixty- seven acres 
are located on U. S. 17 toward Washington. Fifteen acres are located on 
Prison Camp Road. Thirty-six acres of a prospective industrial site are 
near McCasky Road and the railroad tracks. Twenty acres on both sides of 
U. S. 64 just outside the Planning Area are another potential industrial 
site. The location of these industrial sites is depicted on Map 3. 

One should note that much of the labor force of Williamston is employed 
in industries outside of the Williamston area. Industries in Robersonville 
and Plymouth attract many of these workers. This is particularly true of the 
Weyerhaeuser plant near Plymouth, the largest employer in the county. 



33 



UNEMPLOYMENT IN MARTIN COUNTY 

Information about unemployment is scattered throughout the state. Some 
information is in Williamston. Other information is with the Employment 
Security Commission in Raleigh and still more is with the census bureau. 

In February, 1972, the estimated unemployed work force in a 15 mile 
radius of Williamston was 1,545. Of these, 500 were male and 1,045 were 
experienced manufacturing workers. One hundred and forty-five male and 
170 females were considered inexperienced but trainable. 

The number of people receiving unemployment compensation from the state 
is difficult to pinpoint. During the week ending June 30, 1972, 396 checks 
were sent to people in Martin County. During July and August, this number 
will drop to around 240; but the number of recipients will be as high as 
1,200 in the winter months. The unemployment rate varies from year to year 
between 5% and 7% in Martin County but it doesn't go down as far as it goes 
up. Unemployment this year is up 6% from last year judging by the May 
figures. May 1971 - 610 people - 5%; May 1972 - 740 people - 5.6%. 

According to the 1970 census, occupational unemployment is as follows: 

TABLE 5 
OCCUPATIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT 
Occupation Male Fema 1 e Total 

Prof., Technical & Manager 

Sales Worker 

Clerical & Kindred 

Craftsmen, Foremen & Kindred 

Operations, enc . Transportation 



34 



14 


5 


19 


-- 


14 


14 


-- 


20 


20 


58 


114 


172 


29 


11 


40 



Occupation 

Laborers, except farmer 

Farm Workers 

Service Workers, inc. Private 
Households 



Male 
27 
53 

16 
197 



Female 
42 
51 

15 
272 



Total 

69 
104 

31 
469 



35 



TOURIST SITES - WILLIAMSTON , N. C. 

Williamston has nothing to offer tourists that is of any great interest. 
The town advertises its oldest commercial building which is the County Industrial 
Development office but it is not particularly open to the public. Even if 
the building were open, it would not draw crowds because it was built in the 
late 19th century which is no historic treasure. The Asa Biggs home is not 
open to the public and is pointed out by an historical marker one block 
away that does not tell the exact location. 

The Cenoho Indian Village may be a site of interest when restored 
but as of now it has no drawing power. If easily accessible, the Cyrress 
Tree, alledgedly the oldest tree east of the Mississippi, would be an 
attraction; but one must travel by boat to see it. Moratock Park will be nice 
for the townspeople and might be the attraction needed to bring travelers 
to Williamston. 

Fort Branch, near Hamilton, is the best bet for tourism. The recent 
discovery of cannon, if publicized properly, will advertise the Fort. The 
Fort should be restored and would likely bring visitors to Williamston year-round. 

Williamston ' s greatest tourist attraction is its proximity to historical 
and progressive Edenton where historical tours are held daily and where 
dozens of 18th and 19th and even 17th century houses can be found. 



36 



r^. 



^v 





/ 



L 



THE SURVEY 










■■■HH^^H 



■■■■■^^^^HHH 



THE SURVEY 

The following facts about each inspection area is based on information 
obtained in interviews taken in Wi 1 1 iams ton from June 6, 1972 to July 1^, 1972. 
In these interviews questions were asked concerning such diverse items as 
military service, income, rooms, rent, and family composition. A special 
code was used for the houses that were in neighborhoods that were obviously 
standard and were economically well-off, For these houses, only the name of 
the head of the household and address were necessary. In the blank for income, 
50 was inserted. This did not mean that family had an income of fifty thousand 
dollars; the Code 50 means it is obviously a standard house, Henceforth, 
the words Code 50 will be undexstood to mean this. 

Before getting into the data for each inspection area, perhaps it is best 
to give some information on the entire survey. The average income for 
families residing in Will iams ton and its extraterritorial jurisdictional 
area, excluding the Code 50 's, is $4,297. The average rent, including 
utilities, again leaving out Code 50's, was $57.15 a month. The Code 50's 
in this survey represented 48.6% of the total number of houses done. 

The basis for classifying houses substandard in the survey are having 
one or more of the following: no inside private hot -and- cold water; no 
inside individual bath or shower; no individual flush toilet, town sewer 
or septic tank; no individual inside operating sink; no individual operating 
stove; or no adequate and safe heat in all living areas. On this basis, 
20.3% of all houses, including the Code 50" s, are substandard. Excluiing the 
Code 50 "s, the substandard figure is 39.3% 

The following information is based on full internets and hence does not 
include Code 50 ' s . The people that owned their houses numbered 271; the people 

that. were, buying houses, 108; people renting houses, 345; people renting apart- 
ments, 76; people renting rooms, 1]; and people having o r her occupancy 
(mainly duplexes), 8.1. ^g 



Most of the people had some source of water. Eight hundred and 
seventy- six houses had municipal water. Twelve had well water. Only three 
had no source of water. 

The following information concerns standards for substandard housing. 
The main course for substandard housing as far as water in dwellings is 
concerned, is cold water only, private and inside. One hundred and eighty- 
six houses had this. There were only combined totals of twenty- four other 
reasons for not having the standard private, inside, hot-and-cold water. 
Six hundred and eighty-one are standard in this respect. 

An astonishing 170 houses have no bathing facilities. Ten have outside 
and/or multi-family baths or showers. Seven hundred and eleven do have baths 
or showers . 

Eight hundred and sixty-one have the standard sewage disposal- flush 
toilet, individual, town sewer, or septic tank. Eighteen of thirty sub- 
standard have outside privies. 

Most of the houses had operating sinks that were inside and individual. 
Only thirty- six did not meet this standard. Likewise, only fourteen did not 
meet the standard of an individual operating stove. 

Six hundred and eleven houses had adequate and safe heat in all living 
areas, One had adequate but unsafe heat. Two hundred and thirty- eight had 
safe but inadequate heat. Thirty- seven had unsafe and inadequate heat. There 
was one "other" heat. 

There are other questions that were asked in the interviews. They will 
be dealt with in further detail in the analysis of each area. 

It should be noted that this survey covered 81% of the dwellings in 
Williamston, based upon a total of 2,121 dwellings. The information given, 
then, must be assumed to be fairly accurate. Some figures, however, will not 
total correctly because some questions were not answered. 

40 



Most of the people had some source of water. Eight hundred and 
seventy- six houses had municipal water. Twelve had well water. Only three 
had no source of water. 

The following information concerns standards for substandard housing. 
The main course for substandard housing as far as water in dwellings is 
concerned, is cold water only, private and inside. One hundred and eighty- 
six houses had this. There were only combined totals of twenty- four other 
reasons for not having the standard private, inside, hot-and-cold water. 
Six hundred and eighty-one are standard in this respect. 

An astonishing 170 houses have no bathing facilities. Ten have outside 
and/or multi-family baths or showers. Seven hundred and eleven do have baths 
or showers . 

Eight hundred and sixty-one have the standard sewage disposal- flush 
toilet, individual, town sewer, or septic tank. Eighteen of thirty sub- 
standard have outside privies. 

Most of the houses had operating sinks that were inside and individual. 
Only thirty- six did not meet this standard. Likewise, only fourteen did not 
meet the standard of an individual operating stove. 

Six hundred and eleven houses had adequate and safe heat in all living 
areas. One had adequate but unsafe heat. Two hundred and thirty- eight had 
safe but inadequate heat. Thirty- seven had unsafe and inadequate heat. There 
was one "other" heat. 

There are other questions that were asked in the interviews. They will 
be dealt with in further detail in the analysis of each area. 

It should be noted that this survey covered 81% of the dwellings in 
Williamston, based upon a total of 2,121 dwellings. The information given, 
then, must be assumed to be fairly accurate. Some figures, however, will not 
total correctly because some questions were not answered. 

40 



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43 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 197 2 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1. Occupancy 
Owner - 269 
Buying - 108 
Rent House - 347 
Rent Apt. - 76 
Rent Room - 11 
Other - 81 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 876 
Well - 1.1 

None - 3 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 

H&C Insd-Prvt - 681 
H&C Insd Mltifmly - 
C only-insd-pvt - 186 
C only insd-mltifmly - '. 
C only outsd-prvt - 17 
C only outsd-multifmly ■ 
Other - 3 



Area 



TOTAL AREAS 



Stove- Operating 
Indvd - 877 
Shared - 2 
None - 8 
Other - 4 

Heat- Living Areas 
Adeqt-safe - 611 
Adeqt - unsafe - 1 
Inadeqt - safe - 238 
Inadeqt- unsafe - 37 

Total Rooms Bedrooms 



One 


11 


104 


Two 


6 


393 


Three 


105 


304 


Four 


279 


67 


Five 


220 


16 


Six 


153 


1 


Seven 


111 


1 



10 



Average Rent w/Utilities $57.00 



Bath/ Shower 11. 

Insd- indvd - 711 

Insd-mltifmly - 7 

Outsd- indvd - 2 

Outsd-ml tifmly - 1 

None - 170 

Other - 

Sewage Disposal 

Flush Tlet-town-indv - 859 

Flush t let- town- shared - 7 12. 

Flush tlet-sptc tnk ind - 2 

Flush tlet-sptc tnk shrd - 

Privy outside- shared - 18 

Privy outside- indv - 1 

Other - 4 

Sink- Operating 

Insd- indvd - 855 13, 

Insd - shared - 7 

Outsd indvd - 5 

Outsd shared - 1 

Other - 23 



Fa.mil y Comp. 

1 adit- no chid - 125 

1 adlt-w/chld - 140 

2 ad It- no chid - 187 
2 adlt-w/chld - 330 
2+adlt fmly grp-no chid - 
2+adlt fmly grp-w/chld 56 
2+adlt non-fmly grp- 17 
Other - 

Number of Children 

One - 164 

Two - 111 

Three - 109 

Four - 52 

Five +87 

Noe - 361 

Displaced Family 
Fire-wind- flood - 51 
Condemnation- govt - 22 
Eviction - 3 
Other - 7 
No - 801 



29 



45 



14. Disabled- (job/serv) 
No - 642 

Yes - 243 

15. Handicapped 
No - 803 
Disease - 71 
Birth Defect - 1 
Accident - 5 
Other - 4 

16. Social Services 
No - 703 

Yes - 181 

17. Social Security 
No - 600 

Yes - 284 



18. Military- Fmly Head 
Present - 5 

Hon dis, not disabl - 158 
Hon disc, disab - 14 
Not hon dis, not dis - 
Not hon dis, disabl - 1 
No milit serv - 700 
Other - 2 

19. Average Family Income $4,297.00 

20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 145 
Good - 185 

Fair - 250 
Deteriorated - 155 
Dilapidated - 152 

21. Total Interviews: 893 



46 



Area 1 is in the northeastern section of the town, bounded by Main Street 
on the South, Smithwick Street on the west, the Roanoke River on the east, 
and for all practical purposes, the Skewakee Gut Canal on the north. The 
area actually extends northward to the limit of the extraterritorial jurisdic- 
tion area, however, nothing is between the canal and the jurisdiction area 
limit. Only one block of Main Street in Area 1 is zoned commercial. Along 
River Road, which is dirt, is Moratock Park. The rest of Area 1 is zoned one 
family residential. Williamston High School is located in this area as well 
as Church Street Elementary School. 

Unpaved roads appear sporadically throughout the area, River Road, 
Thelma Street, Ormond Street, the northern most block of Henderson Street, the 
eastern most block of Franklin Street, one block of Woodlawn Drive, and the 
eastern most block of Church Street are all unpaved. 

A housing project is located on East Main, Thelma, Henderson, and Church 
Streets in Area 1. The general area of the housing project contained three 
illegitimate births in the past year and two people with venereal disease 
contracted within the past year. The project area was also the only section 
of Area 1 with low education and breaking and entering. 

No industry is located in Area 1. The area is served mainly by six- inch 
water lines. 

Seventy- two full interviews were taken in Area 1. There were 165 Code 
50 houses listed in the area. Of the 72 full interviews taken, twenty-seven 
were in the housing project. Substandard living conditions exist in 36.4% of 
the 45 houses that are neither Code 50 nor in the housing project. When all 
houses in the area are considered, however, the figure is only 6.8%. Eight 
houses have no hot water. 



47 



There are also eight houses that do not have a bath tub or shower and 
four others in which the bath is shared with another family. Five houses do 
not have a one family toilet and one house that has no toilet at all. Sinks 
are used by more than one family in five homes and three houses have no sink. 
There is no stove in four houses and another house in which a stove is shared 
by two families. One house has inadequate heating, but it was determined 
safe. Twenty- five percent of the houses given full interviews were rated 
deteriorated or delapidated. 

Of the seventy- two families that were questioned, ten own their home, 
six are buying, fifteen are renting a house, seventeen are renting an apart- 
ment, five are renting a room, and nineteen are renting a duplex. Forty-one 
families or 57% of the families live in a three or four room house. Ninety 
percent of the families have no more than three bedrooms. There are eight 
homes that have more than one family in them and one house which five 
families live in. 

Eighteen adults live in houses alone and sixteen adult couples live in 
houses alone. There are fourteen houses with children and one adult, and 
twenty homes with children and two adults. Two houses house more than two 
adults in a family group with no children and one home with more than two 
adults in a family group with children. There is one house that has more 
than two adults with no family ties. 

Twenty-one families in Area 1 have been displaced - 10 by fire, wind, 
or flood and 11 by condemnation of their house by the government. Thirty- five 
families have at least one family member disabled and twelve have at least 



48 






one family member handicapped by disease. Twenty-six families receive social 
service assistance and twenty- eight receive social security assistance. Only 
one family head is presently in service and only seven have been in the 
military in the past. Sixty- four family heads have had no military background 

The average income of the seventy- two families interviewed in Area 1 is 
$2,848.00 per year and the average rent is $58.00 per month. 



49 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1 . Occupancy 
Onwer - 10 
Buying - 6 
Rent House - 15 
Rent Room - 5 
Other - 19 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 72 
Well - 

None - 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwel ling 
H&C insd-prvt - 64 
H&C insd-mltifmly - 
C only- insd-prvt - 8 

C only insd-mltifmly - 
C only outsd-prvt - 
C only outsd-multifmly - 
Other - 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd-indvd - 60 
Insd-mltifmly - 4 
Outsd-indvd - 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None - 8 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet- town- indv - 66 
Flush tlet- town- shared - 5 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk ind - ( 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shrd - 
Privy outside- shared - 
Privy outside- indvd - 
Other - 1 

6 Sink- Operating 
Insd-indvd - 64 
Insd- shared - 5 
Outsd indvd - 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 3 



Area 



#1 



Stove- Operating 
Indvd- 67 
Shared - 1 
None - 4 
Other - 

Heat- Living Areas 
Adeqt-safe - 71 
Adeqt- unsafe - 
Inadeqt-safe - 1 
Inadeqt-unsaf e - 



9. 


Total Rooms Bedrooms 




One 5 30 




Two 1 21 




Three 23 14 




Four 18 5 




Five 10 2 




Six 7 




Seven+ 8 


10. 


Average Rent w/Utilitie 


11. 


Family Comp. 




1 adlt-no chid - 18 




1 adlt-w/chld - 14 




2 adlt-no chid - 16 




2 adlt-w/chld - 20 




2+adlt fmly grp-no chid 




2+adlt fmly grp-w/chld 




2+adlt non-fmly grp - 1 




Other - 


12. 


Number of Children 




One - 15 




Two - 3 




Three - 3 




Four - 4 




Five+ - 10 




None - 37 



13. Displaced Family 

Fire-wind- flood - 10 
Condemnation- govt . - 11 
Eviction - 
Other - 
No - 51 



50 



14. Disabled 

No - 37 
Yes - 35 



( Job/Serv) 



15. Handicapped 
No - 60 
Disease - 12 
Birth Defect - ( 
Accident - 
Other - 

16. Social Services 
No - 46 

Yes - 26 

17. Social Security 
No - 44 

Yes - 28 



Military- Family Head 
Present - 1 
Hon Dis, not disabl - 
Hon dis, disabl - 1 
Not hon disc, not dis 
Not hon disc, disabl - 
No Military Service - 
Other - 



-- 


61 



19. Average Family Income - $2,848.00 

20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 32 
Good - 13 

Fair - 8 

Deteriorated - 9 
Dilapidated --9 

21. Total Interviews: 72 






51 



Area 2, 296 dwellings were accounted for in the interviews. Of these 
interviews, 198 were Code 50 ■ s . 

Area 2 is bounded on the south by Main Street, on the east by Smithwick 
Street, on the west by Elm Street and Broad Street. It is served mainly by 
six inch water lines, but has a mixture of four, eight, and ten- inch lines 
also. It is in the area where there was high resistance to the survey and where 
there are great areas of low education. Much of it is plagued by juvenile 
delinquency. There were no cases of tuberculosis and venereal disease in 
the Area during the last year. There were a few cases of illegitimate births 
in Area 2. Part of Rhodes and Mulberry Streets are dirt. 

Ninety- eight of the interviews in Area II were not Code 50' s as was 
implied above. From these the following data was obtained. 

The occupancies of the dwellings were as follows: owner, 39; buying 6; 
rent house, 43; rent apartment, 3; and other, mainly duplexes, 9. 

The water source of this area is municipal for 95, well for 2 and none 
for 1. Eighty have hot-and-cold water for private use inside. Seventeen 
have only cold water inside for private use. One has cold water on the out- 
side for private use. 

Inside individual baths or showers were found in eighty-six dwellings. 
One had an outside bath for individual use. Eleven have no way of bathing. 

Ninety- three have individual town flush toilets. One has an individual 
flush toilet connected to a septic tank. Four have individual outside privies. 



52 



Ninety- five have operating, inside individual sinks. One has an outside 
shared sink. There are two "other" sinks. 

There are ninety- seven individual stoves. One has "other" stove. 

Eighty- six have safe and adequate heat for all living areas. Twelve 
have safe, but inadequate heat. 

The dwellings in Area 2 have mainly four, five, or six rooms. There are 
33 that have four rooms, 32 that have five rooms, and 15 that have six rooms. 
The total number of dwellings having other numbers of rooms is 17. These 
dwellings have different numbers of bedrooms. Seven have 1 bedroom; forty- 
nine have 4 bedrooms ; and one has 5 bedrooms . 

The family composition of these dwellings varied. Fifteen had one adult 
without any children; four had one adult with children; 31 have two adults 
with no children; 29 have two adults with children; eight are family groups 
with more than two adults with no children; and eleven have more than two 
adults with children. 

Five families were displaced by fire, wind, or flood. One was displaced 
because of government condemnation. Two have "other" displacements. Ninety 
have not been displaced. 

Twenty- five of ninety- eight families have a disabled person in the 
family. Three are handicapped by disease; one, by birth defect; and another, 
by accident. Twenty-four receive social service assistance. Thirty- three 
receive social security benefits. 

Twenty- two have the family head receiving an honorable discharge from 
the military without being disabled. Seventy-six have no military service. 



53 



The average rent, including utilities, in Area 2 is $51.68. The average 
income for the area is $4,802.00. The percent of non-Code 50 dwellings that 
are substandard is 23.4%. The percent of all dwellings that are substandard 
is 7.4%. All the dwellings that are evaluated as deteriorated or dilapi- 
dated equal 12.7% of the non-Code 50 ' s . 



54 



Williams ton, North Carolina 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 

Area 



1 . Occupancy 
Owner - 37 
Buying - 6 
Rent House - 43 
Rent Apt. - 3 
Rent Room - 
Other - 9 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 95 
Well - 2 

None - 1 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 
H&C insd-prvt - 80 
H&C insd mltifmly - 
C only- insd prvt - 17 

C only- insd mltifmly - 
C only outsd- prvt - 1 
C only outsd-mltifmly - 
Other - 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd- indvd - 86 
Insd-mltifmly - 
Outsd- indvd - 1 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None - 11 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet- town- indvd - 93 
Flush tlet- town- shared - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk indvd - 1 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shrd - 
Privy outside- shared - 4 
Privy outside- indvd - 
Other - 

6 . S ink - Op e ra t ing 
Insd- indvd - 95 
Insd- shared - 
Outsd indvd - 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 2 



13 



#2 



7. 


Stove- Opera t 
Indvd - 97 
Shared - 
None - 
Other - 1 


ing 


8. 


Heat- Living Areas 




Adeqt-safe - 


86 




Adeqt- unsafe 


- 




Inadeqt-saf e 


- 12 




Inadeqt- unsafe - 


9. 


Total Rooms 


Bedrooms 




One 1 


7 




Two 


49 




Three 7 


31 




Four 33 


9 




Five 32 


1 




Six 15 







Seven+ 9 





10. 


Average Rent 


w/Utilities $52.00 


11. 


Fami ly Comp . 





1 adit -no chid - 15 

1 adlt-w/chld - 4 

2 adit- no chid - 31 
2 adlt-w/chld - 29 

2+ adit fmly grp-no chid - 8 
2+ adit fmly grp-w/chld - 11 
2+ adit non-fmly grp - 
Other - 

12. Number of Children 



One - 


18 


Tyro - 


13 


Three 


- 3 


Four - 


3 


F.ive+ 


- 7 


None - 


54 



Displaced Family 
Fire- wind- flood - 5 
Condemnat ion- govt . - 1 
Eviction - 
Other - 2 
No - 90 



55 



14. Disabled- (Job/ Serv) 
No - 73 

Yes - 25 

15. Handicapped 
No - 93 
Disease - 3 
Birth Defect - 1 
Accident - 1 
Other - 

16. Social Services 
No - 74 

Yes - 24 

17. Social Security 
No - 65 

Yes - 33 



19, 
20, 



Mi 1 i ta ry - Fami ly Head 

Present - 

Hon Dis, not disabl - 22 

Hon Dis, disabl - 

Not Hon Dis, not disabl - 

Not Hon Dis, disabl - 

No Military Service - 76 

Other - 

Average Family Income - $4,802.00 

Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 
Good - 31 
Fair - 51 
Deteriorated - 9 
Dilapidated - 3 



21. 



Total Interviews 



98 



56 



Area 3 is in the southeastern section of the town, bounded by Main Street 
on the north, the Roanoke River on the east, the extraterritorial jurisdictional 
area limit on the south, and Haughton Street on the west. Main Street is 
commercial from Haughton Street to Biggs Street west of Smithwick and south 
of Marshall (not including the houses on the south side of Marshall Street) is 
commercial. The by-pass is commercial and some light industry exists off the 
by-pass. The rest of the area is zoned one family residential. Hutton Street 
and the southern most block of Harrell Street are unpaved streets. The health 
department and courthouse are located in Area 3. 

Breaking and entering has occurred on East Main Street and Harrison 
Street in the past year. There were no reports of tuberculosis, venereal disease, 
or illegitimate births in the past year. There is a high percentage of low 
education east of Watts Street. As a survey team, we were not well received 
in this area. An eight hundred acre potential industrial site is located on 
the river south of the by-pass. The residential areas are served mainly by four 
inch water lines and the commercial areas by six inch water lines. 

One hundred thirty- nine full interviews were taken in Area 3. There 
were eleven Code 50 houses listed in the Area. Substandard living conditions 
exist in 17.3% of the 139 houses interviewed. Nine houses did not have hot 
water, but do have inside cold water. One house has only cold water outside. 
Two houses have a bath tub or shower shared by more than one family and eight 
houses no shower or tubs. Toilets are shared in two houses by more than one 
family and one house has an outdoor privy. Sinks are shared at two houses 
and one house has no sink. At one house a stove is shared by two families and 
at another there is no stove. Fifteen houses have inadequate and unsafe heat. 
Eleven percent of the houses interviewed were rated deteriorated or dilapidated. 

57 



Of the 139 families that were asked full interviews, 50 own their home, 
21 are buying, 46 rent a house, 14 rent apartments, 2 rent rooms, and seven 
rent a duplex. Forty-nine percent of the houses are four or five rooms and 
34% are six or seven rooms. Seventy- six percent of the houses have two or 
three bedrooms. There are five houses in which two families and three houses 
in which three families live. 

Twenty- four adults live in houses alone and forty- four adult couples live 
alone. There are eleven houses with children and one adult and forty-nine 
houses with children and two adults. There are two houses in which more than 
two adults in a family group live without children and three where there are 
children. Four houses house more than two adults in a non- family group. 

Six families in Area 3 have been displaced by fire, wind, or flood. 
Thirty- seven families have at least one family member disabled and seventeen 
have at least one family member handicapped by disease. Seven families 
receive social service assistance and forty-six receive social security 
assistance. Two family heads are presently in the service and forty-five 
have served in the past. Four of these men were disabled when they were 
discharged. 

The average income in Area 3 is $6,205,00 per year and the average rent 
is $67.00 per month. 



58 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1 . Occupancy 
Owner - 50 
Buying - 21 
Rent House - 46 
Rent Apt. - 14 
Rent Room - 2 
Other - 7 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 139 
Well - 

None - 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 

H&C insd-prvt - 129 
H&C insd-mltifmly - 
C only - insd-prvt - 9 
C only insd-mltifmly - 
C only outsd-prvt - 1 
C only outsd-mltifmly - 
Other - 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd-indvd - 129 
Insd-mltifmly - 2 
Outsd-indvd - 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None - 8 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet-town-indv - 136 
Flush tlet- town- shared - 2 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk ind - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shared - 
Privy outside- shared - 1 
Privy outside - indvd - 
Other - 

6. Sink- Operating 
Insd-indvd- 136 
Insd- shared - 2 
Outsd indvd - 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 1 



Area 



#3 



13 



Stove- Operating 
Indvd - 137 
Shared - 1 
None - 
Other -- 1 

Heat- Living Areas 
Adeqt-safe - 120 
Adeqt-unsafe - 
Inadeqt-safe - 15 
Inadequt- unsafe - 3 

Total Rooms Bedrooms 





One 


2 


15 




Two 





47 




Three 


7 


59 




Four 


33 


14 




Five 


35 


3 




Six 


27 


1 




Seven+ 


35 





10. 


Average 


Rent 


w/Util 


11. 


Family 


Comp. 





1 adlt-no chid - 24 

1 adlt-w/chld - 11 

2 adlt-no chid - 44 
2 adlt-w/chld - 49 

2+ adit fmly grp-no chid 
2+ adit fmly grp-w/chld ■ 
2+ adit non-fmly group - 
Other 

12. Number of Children 



One - 


22 


Two - 


16 


Three 


- 


Four - 


• 3 


Five+ 


5 


None - 


• 7 



Displaced Family 
Fire-wind-flood - 6 
Condemnation-govt . - 
Eviction - 
Other - 
No - 131 



59 



14, 



15, 



Disabled - 
No. - 101 
Yes - 37 



(Job/Serv) 



Handicapped 
No - 121 
Diseased - 17 
Birth Defect ■ 
Accident - 
Other - 



18. Military- Family Head 
Present - 2 

Hon dis, not disabl - 41 

Hon dis, disabl - 4 

Not hon dis, not disabl - 

Not hon dis, disabl - 

No military service - 89 

Other 

19. Average Family Income $6,205.00 



16. Social Services 
No - 131 

Yes - 7 

17. Social Security 
No - 92 

Yes - 46 



20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 56 
Good - 43 

Fair - 25 
Deteriorated - 6 
Dilapidated - 9 

21. Total Interviews : 



139 



60 



In Area 4, 210 dwellings were accounted for in the interviews. Of these 
interviews, 47 were Code 50 ' s . 

Area 4 is bounded on the south by the extraterritorial jurisdictional 
line, on the west by the railroad tracks, on the north by Main Street, and the 
east by Haughton Street. It is served by mainly six inch water line but does 
have a few four, eight, and ten inch lines. It had a small area that was 
resistant to the survey. It is an area where low education predominates. 
It is plagued by breaking and entering and juvenile deliquency. There were no 
cases of tuberculosis reported last year. There were several cases of 
illegitimate births and venereal disease. Factory Street, New Street, Tank 
Street, Hunter Street, and part of Railroad Street are dirt. 

One hundred and sixty- three interviews were not Code 50 ' s . The following 
data is based upon these interviews. 

The occupancies of the dwellings were as follows: owner, 5; buying, 6; 
renting, 52; renting apartment, 38; renting room, 1; and "other," mainly 
duplexes, 15. 

The water sources of this area is municipal for all 163. One hundred 
and seventeen have hot-and-cold water for inside private use. Forty-one have 
only cold water for private inside use. Two have cold water inside for multi- 
family use. One has cold water on the outside for private use. One has cold 
water outside for multi-family use. One has "other" water. 

Inside individual baths or showers were found in one hundred and twenty- 
two dwellings. One has an outside multi- family bathing facility. Forty 
have no bathing facilities. 



61 



One hundred and sixty- two have individual flush toilets on the town 
sewage line. One has an individual outside privy. 

One hundred and fifty-nine have operating inside individual sinks. One 
is an outside individual sink. Three have "other" sinks. 

There are one hundred and fifty- nine individual stoves. Three have no 
stoves and one has "other" stove. 

One hundred and thirteen have adequate and safe heat in all living areas. 
Forty- nine have inadequate but safe heat. One has inadequate and unsafe heat. 

There is one one- room dwelling in Area A. Twenty- four dwellings have 
three rooms. Fifty have four rooms. Forty- one have five rooms. Twenty- eight 
have six. Nine have seven. Five have eight. Five have nine rooms. Twelve 
of these dwellings have one bedroom. One hundred and twelve have 2 bedrooms; 
seventy-eight have 3 bedrooms; thirteen have 4; and five have 5. 

The family composition also varies greatly. Twenty- three have one adult 
with no children. Thirty-one have one adult with children. Nineteen have 
two adults with no children. Seventy- two have two adults with children. 
Seven have more than two adults with no children. Eleven have more than two 
adults with children. 

Nine of the families have been displaced because of fire, wind, or flood. 
Five have been displaced because of government condemnation. Two have been dis- 
placed for other reasons. One hundred and forty- seven have not been displaced. 

Thirty- five of the one hundred and sixty- three families have some 
family member living in the dwelling disabled. Five are handicapped by 
disease; two by accident; and two by other means. Twenty- six receive social 
service assistance. Fifty receive social security benefits. 



62 



Twenty- four have heads of the household on honorable discharge from 
the military without being disabled. One received no honorable discharge 
and was disabled. One hundred and thirty-four have no military service. 

The average rent, including utilities, in this Area is $54.40. The 
average income is $3,870.00. The percent of non-Code 50 dwellings that are 
substandard is 35.6%. The percent of all dwellings that are substandard is 
27.6%. All the dwellings that were evaluated as deteriorated or dilapidated 
equals 41% of the non-Code 50' s. 



63 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1 . Occupancy 
Owner - 51 
Buy ing - 6 
Rent House - 52 
Rent Apt. - 38 
Rent Room - 1 
Other - 15 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 163 
Well - 

None - 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 

H&C insd-prvt - 117 

H&C insd mltifmly - 

C only insd prvt - 41 

C only insd mltifmly - 2 

C only outsd prvt - 1 

C only outside-mltifmly - 1 

Other - 1 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd- indvd- 122 
Insd-mltifmly - 
Outsd- indvd - 
Outsd-mltifmly - 1 
None - 40 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet- town- indvd - 162 
Flush tlet- town- shared - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk indvd - ( 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shrd - 
Privy outside- shared - 1 
Privy outside- indvd - 
Other - 

6. Sink-Operating 
Insd- indvd - 159 
Insd- shared - 
Outsd indvd - 1 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 3 



Area 



#4 



Stove- Operating 
Indvd - 159 
Shared - 
None - 3 
Other - 1 

Heat- Living Areas 
Adeqt-safe - 113 
Adeqt- unsafe - 
Inadeqc - safe - 49 
Inadeqt- unsafe - 1 

Total Rooms Bedrooms 



One 


1 


19 


Two 





65 


Three 


24 


59 


Four 


50 


14 


Five 


41 


5 


Six 


28 





Seven+ 


19 


1 


10, Averagi 


2 Rent w/Utilities $5 


1 1 , Fami ly 
1 ad.lt- 


Comp. 
-no chid ■ 


- 23 


1 adit- 


-w/chld - 


31 


2 adlt- 


-no chid - 


- 19 


2 adit- 


•w/chld - 


72 


2+adlt 
2+adlt 
2+adlt 
Other - 


fmly grp-no chid - 7 
fmly grp/w/chld - 11 
non- fmly grp - 
■ 1 


12. Number 


of Children 


One - 36 




Two - 24 




Three - 


23 




Four - 


11 




Five+ - 


16 




None 


53 





13 o Displaced Family 

Fire-wind-flood - 9 
Condemnation- govt -5 
Eviction - 
Other - 2 
No - 147 



64 



14. Disabled- (Job/Serv) 
No - 128 

Yes - 35 

15. Handicapped 
No - 153 
Disease- 5 
Birth Defect - 
Accident - 2 
Other - 2 

16. Social Services 
No - 137 

Yes - 26 

17. Social Security 
No - 113 

Yes - 50 



18. Military- Family Head 
Present - 

Hon dis, not disabl - 24 
Hon dis, disabl - 4 
Not hon dis, not disabl - 
Not hon dis, disabl - 1 
No Military service - 134 
Other - 

19. Average Family Income - $3,870 

20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 35 
Good - 18 

Fair - 43 
Deteriorated - 40 
Dilapidated - 27 

21. Total Interviews : 163 






65 



In Area 5, 241 dwellings were accounted for in the interviews. Of these 
interviews, 20 were Code 50 ■ s . 

Area 5 is bounded on the south by Main Street; on the west by a line 
running north from approximately the intersection of the railroad tracks and 
Main Street; on the north by the extraterritorial jurisdictional line; and on 
the east by Elm Street and Broad Street. It is served mainly by six- inch 
water lines but does have a few four and ten inch lines. It was an area where 
there was very little resistance to the survey. Large portions of Area 5 have 
people with low education. Nearly all of the area has problems with juvenile 
delinquency. There are a few cases of tuberculosis that were reported in the 
last year. This area has the largest concentration of reported cases of 
venereal disease and illegitimate births in the Town of Williamston. Lenier 
Street, Hanes Street, part of Hamilton Street, Gurganus Street, Franklin 
Street, South Broad Street, and Academy Street are dirt. New Avenue is paved 
but has no curb and gutter. 

Two hundred and twenty- one interviews were not Code 50 ' s . The following 
data is based upon these interviews. 

The occupancies of the dwellings were as follows: owner, 89; buying, 22; 
rent house, 90; rent apartment, 0; rent room, 2; and "other" mainly duplexes, 17 

The water source is municipal for 219. One has no water. One hundred 
and seventy have hot-and-cold water for inside private use. Forty- six have 
only cold water for private inside use. Three have cold water on the outside 
for private use. One has "other" water. 



66 



Inside individual baths or showers were found in one hundred and seventy- 
nine dwellings. One has an inside multi- family bathing facility. Forty have 
no bathing facilities. 

Two hundred and eighteen have individual flush toilets on the town sewage 
line. One has an individual outside privy. One has a shared outside privy. 

Two hundred and sixteen have individual, inside operating sinks. Four 
have "other" sinks, mainly none. 

Two hundred and twenty have individual operating stoves. This accounts 
for all that answered the question. 

One hundred and seventy- three have adequate and safe heat in all living 
areas. Forty- seven have safe but inadequate heat. 

There is one one- room house in Area 5. Fourteen have three- room dwellings 
Seventy-nine are four-roomedc Fifty- six have five rooms. Thirty-nine have 
six. Fourteen have seven. Ten have eight. Seven have nine. Twelve have 
one bedroom. One hundred and twelve have two bedrooms. Seventy-eight have 
three bedrooms. Thirteen have four bedrooms. Five have five bedrooms. 

The family composition in Area 5 varies greatly. Twenty- four have one 
adult with no children. Thirty-six have one adult with children. Forty- 
three have two adults with no children. Eighty-three have two adults with 
children. Ten have more than two adults without children. Twenty- four have 
more than two adults with children. 

Eleven have been displaced because of fire, wind, or rain. Two were 
displaced because of governmental condemnation. One was displaced for other 
reasons. Two hundred and six were not displaced. 



67 



Fifty families have at least one member living in the dwelling who is 
disabled. One is handicapped by disease; one by accident; and two by other 
means. Thirty-six receive social service assistance. Sixty-four receive 
social security benefits. 

One family head is in the military at present. Forty- two received 
honorable discharges and were not disabled. Two received honorable discharges 
and were disabled. One hundred and seventy- three had no military service. 
Two had "other." 

The average rent, including utilities, in Area 5 is $51.48. The average 
income is $4,183.09. The percent of non-Code 50' s that are substandard is 
33.5%. The percent of all dwellings that are substandard is 30.7%. All the 
buildings that were evaluated as deteriorated or dilapidated equal 30.4% of 
the non-Code 50 ' s . 



68 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 197 2 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1 . Occupancy 
Owner - 89 
Buying - 22 
Rent House - 90 
Rent Apt. - 
Rent Room - 2 
Other - 17 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 219 
Well - 

None - 1 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 

H&C insd-prvt - 170 
H&C insd mltifmly - 
C only- insd-prvt - 46 
C only- insd-mltifmly - 
C only outsd-prvt - 3 
C only outsd-mltifmly - 
Other - 1 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd- indvd- 179 
Insd-mltifmly - 1 
Outsd- indvd - 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None - 40 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet- town- indvd - 218 
Flush tlet- town- shared - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk indvd - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shrd - 
Privy outside- shared - 1 
Privy outside- indvd - 1 
Other - 

6. Sink-Operating 
Insd- indvd - 216 
Insd- shared - 
Outsd indvd - 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 4 



Area 



#5 



7. 


Stove- Operating 




Indvd - 


220 






Shared - 


--0 






None - 






Other - 







8. 


Heat- Living Areas 




Adeqt-safe - 


173 




Adeqt- Unsafe 


- 




Inadeqt- 


■safe 


- 47 




Inadeqt 


- uns 


;afe - 


9. 


Total 1 


looms 


Bedrooms 




One 


1 


12 




Two 





112 




Three 


14 


78 




Four 


79 


13 




Five 


56 


5 




Six 


39 







Seven+ 


31 





10. 


Average 


Rent 


w/Utilities $51.00 


11. 


Fami ly 1 


Comp , 





1 adlt-no chid - 24 

1 adlt-w/chld - 36 

2 adlt-no chid - 43 
2 adlt-w/chld - 83 
2+adlt fmly grp-no chid 
2+adlt fmly grp-w/chld ■ 
2+adlt non-fmly grp - 
Other - 

12. Number of Children 
One - 38 

Two - 28 
Three - 36 
Fou r - 16 
Five+ - 22 
None - 80 

13. Displaced Family 
Fire-wind- flood - 11 
Condemnation - govt. - ! 
Eviction - 

Other - 1 
No - 206 



■ 10 

24 



69 



14. Disabled- (Job/Serv) 
No - 170 

Yes - 50 

15. Handicapped 
No - 216 
Disease - 1 
Birth Defect - 
Accident - 1 
Other - 2 

16. Social Services 
No - 184 

Yes - 36 

17. Social Security 
No - 155 

Yes - 64 



18. Military- Family Head 
Present - 1 

Hon Dis, not disabl - 42 
Hon Dis, disabl - 2 
Not hon dis, not dis - 
Not hon dis, disabl - 
No military service - 173 
Other - 2 

19. Average Family Income - $4,183.00 

20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 9 

Good - 56 
Fair - 88 
Deteriorated - 54 
Dilapidated - 13 

21. Total Interviews: 221 






70 



Area 6 is in the southwestern section of the town bounded by the railroad 
tracks on the east and north, Woodside Drive, Vepco Avenue, and a ditch on the 
west, and the extraterritorial jurisdictional area limit on the south. Commerce 
is located on Washington Street, the by-pass, and U. S. 17 south. A shopping 
center is planned in the area. Some light industry is zoned in the area. 
E. J. Hayes Junior High School is located in Area 6. The rest of the area 
is zoned residential 

Unpaved streets are scattered throughout the residential area. The 
northern most block of Andrews Street, Hyman Street, Missouri Street, the 
northern most block of Faulk Street, Skinner Street, the northern most block 
of Morrison Street, Gentry Street, Susie Street, one block of Peele Street, 
Critcher Street, Canal Street, Dodge Street, the northern most block of 
Perry Street, Taylor Avenue, Cedar Land, and streets at the country club are 
all unpaved. 

Low education is dominant in all residential areas north of the by-pass 
As a survey team, we had very little trouble in Area 6. Breaking and enter- 
ing was reported on Washington Street and juvenile complaints were reported 
in all residential areas north of the by-pass last year. One case of VD 
was reported on Carolina Avenue and one on Faulk Street last year. Two 
cases of tuberculosis were reported in Area 6 last year. One on Skinner 
Street and one on Faulk Street. Three illegitimate births were reported here 
last year. One was on Morrison Street, one on Peele Street, and one on 
Critcher Street. 

A 167 acre potential light industrial site is located just outside the 
city limits on U.S. 17 south in Area 6. Area 6 is served by six and eight 
inch water lines. 



71 



One hundred eighty- seven full interviews were taken in Area 6. Twenty- 
two Code 50 houses were listed in the area. Substandard living conditions 
exist in 80.2% of the houses interviewed, but in only 71.8% of the total 
number of houses. Sixty- five houses have cold water only inside the house. 
Nine houses have cold water only outside and one house has no water. One 
house only has an outside shower and sixty houses have no bath tub or shower. 
Ten houses have only an outdoor privy and one house has no toilet. Sinks are 
located outside at four houses and nine houses have no sink. Two houses have 
no stove. Heating is very bad in this area. Only 39 houses have adequate- 
safe heating while one house has adequate- unsafe heating, 111 have inadequate- 
safe and 33 have inadequate-unsafe. Sixty- three percent of the houses given 
the complete interview were rated deteriorated or delapidated. 

Of the 187 families given the interview, 30 own their house, 47 are 
buying, 94 are renting a house, 3 rent an apartment, 1 rents a room, and 12 
rent a duplex. Forty- eight percent of the families in Area 6 live in three 
or four room houses while forty- two percent live in five or six room houses. 
Sixty percent of the houses are one or two bedroom houses and forty percent 
are three or four bedroom houses. There are 13 houses in which two families 
live and five houses in which four families live. 

Nineteen adults live in houses alone and thirty adult couples live alone. 
There are 42 houses with children and one adult and 73 houses with children 
and two adults. Six houses have more than two adults in a family with 
children living in them; there are no family groups with more than two adults 
and no children in Area 6. There are twelve non- family groups living in houses 
in Area 6. 



72 



Eighteen families in Area 6 have been displaced - 10 by fire, wind, or 
flood, 3 by condemnation of the house by the government, 3 by eviction, and 
two for other reasons. Fifty-nine families have at least one member disabled 
and 34 have at least one member handicapped - 33 by disease, one by accident. 
Sixty-one families receive social service assistance and sixty receive social 
security assistance. One family head is presently in the service and 23 have 
been. Three of these men were disabled when discharged. One hundred fifty- 
eight family heads have no military background. 

The average income in Area 6 is $3,861.00 per year and the averate rent 
is $61.00 per month. 



73 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1. Occupancy 
Owner - 30 
Buying - 47 
Rent House - 94 
Rent Apt. - 3 
Rent Room - 1 
Other - 12 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 182 
Well - 4 

None - 1 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 

H&C insd-prvt - 112 
H&C insd mltifmly - 
C only- insd-prvt -- 64 
C only insd-mltifmly - 1 
C only outsd-prvt - 9 
C only outsd-mltifmly - 
Other - 1 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd-indvd - 126 
Insd-mltifmly - 
Outsd-indvd - 1 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None - 60 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet- town- indv - 176 
Flush tlet- town- shared - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk indvd - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shrd - 
Privy outside- shared - 10 
Privy outside- indvd -- 
Other - 1 

6. Sink-Operating 
Insd-indvd - 174 
Insd- shared - 
Outsd indvd -4 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 9 



Area 



# 6 



Stove- Operating 
Indvd - 185 
Shared - 
None - 1 
Other - 1 

Heat- Living Areas 
Adeqt-safe - 39 
Adeqt- unsafe - 1 
Inadeqt-safe - 111 
Inadeqt-unsaf e - 33 

Total Rooms Bedrooms 



One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven+ 



1 

5 
29 
61 
43 
35 



18 

93 

61 

11 









10. Average Rent w/Utilities $61.00 

11. Family Comp. 

1 adlt-no chid - 19 

1 adlt-w/chld - 42 

2 adlt-no chid - 30 
2 adlt-w/chld - 73 

2+adlt fmly grp-no chid - 
2+adlt fmly grp-w/chld - 6 
2+adlt non-fmly grp - 12 
Other - 

12. Number of Children 
One - 33 

Two - 27 
Three - 24 
Four - 15 
Five+ - 25 
None - 58 

13. Displaced Family 
Five-wind- flood - 10 
Condemnation-govt . - 3 
Eviction - 3 

Other - 2 
No - 164 



74 



14. Disabled- (Job/Serv) 
No - 123 

Yes - 59 

15. Handicapped 
No - 148 
Disease - 33 
Birth Defect - 
Accident - 1 
Other - 1 



18. Military- Family Head 
Present - 1 

Hon dis, not disabl - 20 
Hon dis, disabl - 3 
Not hon dis, not disabl - 
Not hon dis, disabl - 
No military service - 158 
Other - 

19. Average Family Income - $3,861.00 



16. Social Services 
No - 120 

Yes - 61 

17. Social Security 
No - 122 

Yes - 60 



20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 9 

Good - 24 
Fair - 31 
Deteriorated - 36 
Dilapidated - 87 

21. Total Interviews: 187 



75 



Area 7 is on the southwestern section of the town, bounded by Main Street 
and U. S. 64 West on the north, the extraterritorial jurisdictional area on 
the west and Vepco Avenue, Woodside Drive and a ditch on the south and east. 
The County Home is located on U. S. 64 West in Area 7. Commerce is located 
on the by-pass and on Main Street at the city limits. The rest of Area 7 is 
zoned one family residential. A fifteen acre potential light industrial zone 
is on U. S. 64 West in Area 7 and another light industrial zone twenty acres 
is located just outside of Area 7 on U. S. 64 West. 

The educational level of the people in Area 7 is high. No crime has been 
reported here in the past year. No communicable diseases or illegitimate 
births were reported in this area last year* Area 7 is served by six inch 
water lines. 

Only four full interviews were performed in Area 7. One hundred forty- 
four Code 50 houses were listed here. Nineteen people are listed who live in 
the County Home. Two of the four houses interviewed are substandard. Both of 
these houses have cold water outside only, no bath tub or shower, and no 
toilet. One of these houses has no sink and the other has inadequate but safe 
heating. Both houses were rated delapidated. 

Of the four people interviewed, one owns his house, one rents his house, 
one lives in an apartment that is given him as a fringe benefit for his job, 
and another is a tenant farmer. One family lives in each of the four houses. 
Two of the families consist of two adults with no children and two families 
consist of two adults with children. One family lives in a three room house; 
two families live in a four room house; and one family lives in a five room 
house. There is one bedroom in two houses; two houses with two bedrooms; and 
one house with three bedrooms. 

76 



None of the families have been displaced. No family member of any of 
the four families is disabled or handicapped. One family receives social 
service assistance while none of the families receive social security. One 
of the family heads has served in the military. 

Only one family answered the income and rent questions. Its income is 
$1,000.00 per year and its rent is $30.00 per month. 



77 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1 . Occupancy 
Owner - 1 
Buying - 
Rent House - 1 
Rent Apt. - 
Rent Room - 
Other - 2 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 2 
Well - 2 
None - 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 
H&C insd-prvt - 2 

H&C insd miltifmly - 

C only- insd-prvt - 

C only insd-mltifmly - 

C only outsd-prvt - 2 

C only outsd-mltifmly - 

Other - 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd-indvd - 2 
Insd-mltifmly - 
Outsd-indvd - 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None -2 

Other - 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet- town-indvd - 2 
Flush tlet- town shared - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk indvd - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shared 
Privy outside- shared - 
Privy outside - indvd - 
Other - 2 

6. Sink-Operating 
Insd-indvd - 3 
Insd- shared - 
Outsd indvd - 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 1 



Area 



# 7 



7. 


Stove- Operating 




Indvd - 


4 




Shared - 


■ 




None - 




Other - 





8. 


Heat- Living Areas 




Adeqt-safe - 3 




Adeqt-unsafe •• 




Inadeqt- 


■safe - 1 




Inadeqt- 


■unsafe - 1 


9. 


Total 1 


looms Bedrooms 




One 


2 




Two 


1 




Three 


1 1 




Four 


2 




Five 


1 




Six 







Seven+ 





10. 


Average 


Rent w/Utiliti 


11. 


Family < 


3omp . 



$31.00 



1 adlt-no chid - 

1 adlt-w/chld - 

2 adit - no chid - 2 
2 adlt-w/chld - 2 

2+adlt fmly grp-no chid - 
2+adlt fmly grp-w/chld - 
2+adlt non-fmly grp - 
Other - 

12. Number of Children 
One - 1 

Two - 
Three - 
Four - 
Five-f- - 
None - 2 

13. Displaced Family 
Five-wind- flood - 
Condemnation- govt - 
Eviction - 

Other - 
No - 4 



78 



14. Disabled- (Job/Serv) 
No - 4 

Yes - 

15. Handicapped 
No - 4 
Disease - 
Birth Defect - 
Accident - 
Other - 

16. Social Services 
No - 3 

Yes - 1 

17. Social Security 
No - 4 

Yes - 



18. Military- Family Head 
Present - 

Hon dis, not disabl - 1 
Hon dis, disabl - 
Not hon dis, not disabl - 
Not hon dis, disabl - 
No military service - 3 
Other - 

19. Average Family Income - $1,000.00 

20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 1 

Good - 
Fair - 1 

Deteriorated - 
Delapidated - 2 

21. Total Interviews: 4 



79 






Area 8 is in the northwestern section of town bounded by Main Street and 
U. S. 64 West on the south, the extraterritorial jurisdictional area on the 
west and north, and by an imaginary line extending northward from the inter- 
section of Main Street and the railroad tracks. This is an upper income white 
area. There are no dirt roads in Area 8. On Main Street at the city limits, 
there is some neighborhood commerce. At the western end of the area outside 
the city limits are large areas of light and heavy industrial zoning. At 
the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of McCasky Road and the railroad 
track is a 36 acre potential heavy industrial site and a 20 acre site is just 
west of Area 8 on U. S. 64 South. The rest of Area 8 is a one- family residential 

The people in this area are well educated. There has been no crime in 
Area 8 in the past year. No communicable diseases or illegitimate children 
were reported here in the past year. Area 8 is served by six inch water lines. 

Eight full interviews were taken in this area. Two hundred Code 50 
houses were listed in Area 8. Of the eight houses interviewed, three are 
substandard. Two of these were because the heating in the house is inadequate 
but safe. The other house that is substandard is because it only has cold 
water, no bath tub or shower, and anoutside privy. These same three houses 
were rated deteriorated or delapidated. 

Only one of the eight families interviewed owns their home while four 
rent houses and three rent apartments. One family lives in a seven room 
house, two in a six room house, two in a five room house, and three in a 
four room house. Five houses have two bedrooms, and there is one house for 
each of the following number of bedrooms: one, three, and four. Two 
families are composed in each of the following classifications : 1 adult, 

no children; 1 adult with children; 2 adults, no children; and 2 adults with 

children. 

80 



None of the eight families interviewed in Area 8 have been displaced. In 
two families there is at least one family member who is disabled and none of 
the families have handicapped members. Three families are assisted by 
social security. No family in Area 8 receives social service assistance. Only 
one family head has served in the military. 

The average income of the eight families interviewed in Area 8 is 
$4,200.00 per year and the average rent is $77.00 per month. 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
Summer, 1972 



Williams ton, North Carolina 

1 . Occupancy 
Owner - 1 
Buying - 
Rent house - 4 
Rent apt. - 3 
Rent room - 
Other - 

2. Water Source 
Municipal - 4 
Well - 4 
None - 
Other - 

3. Water- Dwelling 
H&C insd-prvt - 7 
H&C insd mltifmly -0 
C only- insd-prvt - 1 

C only insd-mltifmly - 
C only outsd-prvt - 
C only outsd-mltifmly - 
Other - 

4. Bath/ Shower 
Insd-indvd - 7 
Insd-mltifmly - 
Outsd-indvd - 
Outsd-mltifmly - 
None - 1 

Other - 1 

5. Sewage Disposal 

Flush tlet-town indvd - 6 
Flush tlet-town shared - 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk indvd ■ 
Flush tlet-sptc tnk shared 
Privy outside- shared - 1 
Privy outside- indvd - 
Other - o 

6. Sink- Operating 
Insd-indvd - 8 
Insd- shared - 
Outsd indvd - 
Outsd shared - 
Other - 



Area 



Stove- 


Operating 


Indvd 


- 8 




Shared 


- 




None - 







Other 


- 




Heat -I 


iving Areas 


Adeqt- 


safe - 6 




Adeqt- 


unsafe - 





Inadeq 


t-safe - 


2 


Inadeqt- unsafe 


- 


Total 


Rooms 


Bedrooms 


One 





1 


Two 





5 


Three 





1 


Four 


3 


1 


Five 


2 





Six 


2 





Seven+ 


1 






10. Average Rent w/Utilities - $78.00 

1 1 . Fami ly Comp . 

1 adlt-no chid - 2 

1 adlt-w/chld - 2 

2 adlt-no chid - 2 
2 adlt-w/chld - 2 

2+adlt fmly grp-no chid - 
2+adlt fmly grp-w/chld - 
2+adlt non-fmly grp - 
Other - 

12. Number of Children 
One - 1 

Two - 
Three - 1 
Four - 
Five+ - 2 
None - 4 

13. Displaced Family 
Fire-wind- flood - 
Condemnation-govt - 
Eviction - 

Other - 
No - 8 



82 



14. Disabled- ( Job /Serv) 
No - 6 

Yes - 2 

15. Handicapped 
No - 8 
Disease - 
Birth Defect - 
Accident - 
Other - 

16. Social Services 
No - 8 

Yes - 

17. Social Security 
No - 5 

Yes - 3 



18. Military- Family Head 
Present - 

Hon dis , not disabl - 1 
Hon dis, disabl - 
Not hon dis, not disabl - 
Not hon dis, disabl - 
No military service = 6 
Other - 

19. Average Family Income - $4,200.00 

20. Building Evaluation 
Excellent - 3 

Good - 
Fair - 3 

Deteriorated - 1 
Dilapidated - 2 

21. Total Interviews: 9 



83 



J+* 







>» 



^cuiaoNs ANcv 




\ 









CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

The Neighborhood Analysis is to be used in the planning for Williams ton. 
It is an important element in any such planning because it deals with the 
people and their neighborhood problems - not long-range proposals that can be 
conveniently put off for later years. These problems are urgent and must be 
resolved at the earliest date possible. Some problems, needless to say, 
cannot be solved in a week, a year, or even a decade. Yet, even these 
problems' solutions must be started on today. It is the objective of the 
Neighborhood Analysis to provide the data which shows the extent of these 
problems and to give recommendations for the solutions to these problems. Its 
implementation should be related to the overall plans and goals, however, in 
order that the best and most efficient results for the most possible people 
can be achieved. 

Recommended Treatment for Entire Planning Area 

Certain items should be undertaken for the planning area as a whole. 
Other items should be centered around each specific study area. The next 
items should be considered as recommendations and goals for the entire 
planning area. 

One of the first goals of the town should be the paving of every street 
within the city limits of Williamston. Each street should also have the proper 
curbing and guttering. 

Along the same line, the town should approve and begin work at once upon 
a thoroughfare plan. This plan should include a northern by-pass in order to 
prevent trucks from having to drive through the middle of Williamston. 



87 



Another recommendation would be the provision of recreational centers in 
at least every inspection area. These centers should be modeled by the program 
established at the Williamston Junior Police Club. Each center should have 
the proper supervision. 

In the area of fire protection, the first recommendation would be the 
hiring of a full-time fire chief. In addition, the size of the water lines 
should be increased. At the present, the water lines are not large enough to 
provide the necessary water and pressure to put out a major fire. 

Williamston is in great need of industries to provide jobs, It must be 
careful, however, in its selection of industry, These industries should 
provide well-paying jobs. They should not be industries that pollute the 
air or the water. 

There seems to be a lack of knowledge, among the public at large, of 
information concerning birth control and venereal disease. The Martin 
County Health Department should provide a comprehensive educational program 
concerning venereal disease. There should be an adult program as well as 
a program through the public schools. In addition, the Health Department 
should make available birth control information as well as devices to anyone 
who desires them. 

The town should make an effort to preserve any remaining historic 
landmarks. It should assist in the saving of Fort Branch. 

A concerted effort should be made to beautify the downtown commercial 
district. Otherwise, the downtown businesses will suffer when the proposed 
shopping center is built. 



88 



Improvement in the housing condition of Williamston is badly needed. 
Much could be gained just by improving the rental housing by bringing them 
up to standard. Perhaps what is needed most is large apartmental housing. 
Excluding the housing projects, there are very few apartments in Williamston, 

Home-owning should be made easier to low and middle income families by 
providing low interest loans to people who would otherwise be unable to 
obtain loans. In addition, ways should be made available for middle- income 
blacks to get housing outside of low income areas. 

Vacant lots should be cleared of all unsightly debris. They should be 
kept cut, also. All open ditches within the residential areas of town 
should be closed in. 

These recommendations and conclusions if noted and followed through 
with, will make Williamston a better city for its residents and a more 
attractive city for people who might move into the area. 



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RECOMMENDED TREATMENT BY AREA 

Area 1 

Area 1 needs little improvement. Housing should be improved on Ormand 
Street, Roanoke Street, and Henderson Street. Five unpaved streets should be 
paved. The missing segment of Church Street between School Drive and Biggs 
Street should be made and paved. Church Street should be extended to 
Moratock Park. An intensive program directed at educating the residents of 
the housing project about birth control and venereal disease. 

Area 2 

Area 2 needs a recreational center near what is known as "Doodle Hill." 
The housing there, as well as some black areas between Haughton and Broad 
Streets, needs to be brought up to standard. Parts of Rhodes and Mulberry 
Street need paving. Efforts should be made to help the people own their own 
homes in this area. Something must be done to res true t the area of the 
cemetary . It presently sprawls over an irregular area. Integration of 
economic classes would be desirable in this area, but would be somewhat 
infeasible at present. 

Area 3 

Area 3 is basically sound. Harrell Street and Hat ton Street should be 
paved. A recreational area is desperately needed in this area. Housing 
needs to be brought up to standard on East Main Street. 



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Area 4 

Area 4 is in great need of improvement. The housing is substandard 
throughout much of the area. More housing projects is perhaps the only 
answer at the present since few could afford their own homes and since so 
many landlords have dragged their feet about improving their rental property. 
The paving of New Street, Hunter Street, Tank Street, and Railroad Street is 
recommended. Information about venereal disease and birth control should be 
distributed. Job training is needed in this area. This area should be one 
of the first to be treated for improvement since its needs are so desperate. 

Area 5 

Area 5 is probably the best area for an attempt to get people to own their 
own homes. This area is better off economically than Area , yet still has 
a lot of substandard rental housing. Efforts to standardize this housing 
would probably meet with better success since some have already began 
improvements. Lanier, Hanes, Gurganus, and parts of Hamilton and Franklin 
Streets need paving. New Avenue needs only curbing and guttering. A crash 
program for the residents' education about birth control and venereal disease 
is needed due to the high instances of venereal disease and illegitimacy 
during the past year. 

Area 6 

Area 6 is being improved now. All poor sections are in a Neighborhood 
Development (NDP) area. The NDP has not yet started so it is hard to judge 
what will be needed. Several middle class blacks live in this area and are 
unable to get out of the area because of housing prejudices. Something 
should be done to remedy this. 

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All dirt streets in the area should be paved. Information concerning 
birth control and venereal disease is needed in this area. This area should 
be the first priority for improvement. 

Area 7 

Area 7 is in good shape. Unpaved streets should be paved and a 
recreational area should be cleared. 

Area 8 

Area 8 needs the least improvement. Some houses on McGasky Road need 
improving . A recreational area is needed, but there is no vacant land to 
put it on. 



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STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



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